Vegan Eats ◯ Gran Canaria

  Zoe's Food , Las Palmas A really cute cafe in the quaint cobbled streets of Las Palmas old town. The owners are well-travelled, welcoming, sassy South American women who are clearly proud of the international feel and vegetarian/vegan menu they've created at Zoe's. We enjoyed yummy vegan coffees and breakfasts before our flight home on the final day of the trip. Two breakfasts and two coffees came to 17 EUROS. 

Zoe's Food, Las Palmas
A really cute cafe in the quaint cobbled streets of Las Palmas old town. The owners are well-travelled, welcoming, sassy South American women who are clearly proud of the international feel and vegetarian/vegan menu they've created at Zoe's. We enjoyed yummy vegan coffees and breakfasts before our flight home on the final day of the trip. Two breakfasts and two coffees came to 17 EUROS. 

  Bioloco , Las Palmas In the bustling new town – just off the main tourist drag – is Bioloco, a bar/restaurant that states it is '100% CRUELTY FREE'. A bold claim indeed.  Our meal here turned out to be the best value meals we had on the trip and we ended up here again a few nights after our first visit. Buzzing with young, hip Canarians, we didn't hear another English accent in here on either of the nights we visited. Their menu is extensive and includes meat analogues/vegan meat. A meal for two people including a starter to share, two mains, two fresh smoothies/juices, two coffees and a dessert to share came to 31 EUROS only. 

Bioloco, Las Palmas
In the bustling new town – just off the main tourist drag – is Bioloco, a bar/restaurant that states it is '100% CRUELTY FREE'. A bold claim indeed. 
Our meal here turned out to be the best value meals we had on the trip and we ended up here again a few nights after our first visit. Buzzing with young, hip Canarians, we didn't hear another English accent in here on either of the nights we visited. Their menu is extensive and includes meat analogues/vegan meat. A meal for two people including a starter to share, two mains, two fresh smoothies/juices, two coffees and a dessert to share came to 31 EUROS only. 

  La Hierba Luisa , Las Palmas (old town) A little more pricey than Bioloco is La Hierba Luisa, a pretty restaurant in the old town that resembles a new-style Parisian café with big glass windows overlooking the streets. Our vegetarian and vegan meal here was okay (Ñoquis crema brócoli/Broccoli cream gnocchi and Tempeh Kecap) but fairly forgettable. For two starters, two soft drinks and two trendily small mains, the total bill came to 41 EUROS. 

La Hierba Luisa, Las Palmas (old town)
A little more pricey than Bioloco is La Hierba Luisa, a pretty restaurant in the old town that resembles a new-style Parisian café with big glass windows overlooking the streets. Our vegetarian and vegan meal here was okay (Ñoquis crema brócoli/Broccoli cream gnocchi and Tempeh Kecap) but fairly forgettable. For two starters, two soft drinks and two trendily small mains, the total bill came to 41 EUROS. 

  Arte-Gaia , Artenara We'd heard good things about Biocrepería RiscoCaido in Artenara but unfortunately on the evening we were passing through, it was closed. Artenara (the highest village on the island) is a beautiful spot to visit during the day and we'd already enjoyed a fairly long walk up the mountains behind it. Keen to return, on our last night we headed up the steep s-bend roads for the Biocrepería but it was closed so we started to walk down the dark and empty streets of Artenara and by chance we came across the warm glow of Arte-Gaia. By the end of our evening we had declared our meal here as the best we'd had on Gran Canaria – a humble al-fresco vegetarian meal of vegetable soup and fresh mushroom ravioli turned out to be a truly delicious dinner, washed down with a good glass of house wine, it was the perfect end to our trip.  

Arte-Gaia, Artenara
We'd heard good things about Biocrepería RiscoCaido in Artenara but unfortunately on the evening we were passing through, it was closed.
Artenara (the highest village on the island) is a beautiful spot to visit during the day and we'd already enjoyed a fairly long walk up the mountains behind it. Keen to return, on our last night we headed up the steep s-bend roads for the Biocrepería but it was closed so we started to walk down the dark and empty streets of Artenara and by chance we came across the warm glow of Arte-Gaia. By the end of our evening we had declared our meal here as the best we'd had on Gran Canaria – a humble al-fresco vegetarian meal of vegetable soup and fresh mushroom ravioli turned out to be a truly delicious dinner, washed down with a good glass of house wine, it was the perfect end to our trip.  

Other information about gran canaria

You definitely need a car/motorbike/bike in Gran Canaria to enjoy all it has to offer.
Driving/cycling around the island is definitely not for the faint-hearted however – some roads are banned on rainy days (you'll get why when you drive on one!) and the island has a Zero Tolerance Policy on drink-driving (again, easy to understand why when you drive on some of the roads, especially the new coastal road on the North/North West of the island). The roads are well-maintained however so it won't be a pot-hole that gets you unstuck.
 
We spent most of our time in the mountains on this trip (Gran Canaria's UNESCO Biosphere Reserve covers approximately a third of the island), away from the tourist trap beaches, finding some incredible hikes. We can recommend routes Tamadaba (SL 3), Punta de Las Arenas (SL 7) and Montaña Artenara (SL 1). Maps are available from most tourist shops in the higher villages. 

When we needed some beach time we were really keen to find bays the locals used and had a really wonderful day swimming, sunbathing and picnicking on the black volcanic sands of Playa Guayedra

We found this bit a little hard to swallow – Gran Canaria is an island 30miles in diameter with a population of a million people and everyone is drinking bottled water. Apparently the government are working on a desalinisation plant for the island but until that project is complete it sadly only leaves you with a choice between dying from dehydration (it gets ridiculously hot so make sure you have water with you when you hike) or unavoidable plastic pollution. 

All photos © Poppy Zella Reed

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